Gone Girl

Going, Going, Gone!

Book Review for Gone Girl by Gillian FlynnGone Girl by Gillian Flynn

First Line: “When I think of my wife, I always think of her head.”

I read Gone Girl for a book club. I think it’s a popular title for book clubs. It’s been a crazy bestseller. But, like…we all know that a “popular” book does not necessarily constitute a great book, right?

As always, I’ll try to be blunt in my assessment. Gone Girl is only “okay.” It’s a thriller that explores how far people might go for love, for revenge. We have two narrators: Nick and Amy. He’s a little ho-hum, a little cliche. Amy’s voice (we meet her through diary entries) is somewhat more convincing, but her clever quips can feel a little forced.

Flynn creates some interesting hooks to keep us reading, but I’m not wowed or inspired. It’s an easy read–fitting for a beach trip or a book club discussion. For a more dynamic experience, though, I’d recommend The Blind Assassin by Margaret Atwood. The writing style has a little more depth, the characters’ development is more complex, and the plot has exciting twists and turns that, in my opinion, far surpass “surprises” of Gone Girl.

Bottom Line: I’m thinking the upcoming film adaptation might be an improvement!

The Valley of Amazement

Escape to the House of Woe

Valley of Amazement by Amy Tan

The Valley of Amazement by Amy Tan

First Line: “When I was seven, I knew exactly who I was: a thoroughly American girl in race, manners, and speech, whose mother, Lulu Minturn, was the only white woman who owned a first-class courtesan house in Shanghai.”

I’ve been meaning to read Amy Tan for awhile now, so her new bestseller seemed like a good place to start. The Valley of Amazement definitely maintains the mother-daughter theme that Tan is known for, but I finished this novel with the hunch that her other works must be better.

Yes, the reader is transported. The courtesan-culture of Shanghai is explored in extreme detail. Even the minor characters are memorable. We are given a sweeping history of, not one, but multiple female characters. We have two narrators to inform us of the family’s genealogy, and, surprisingly, I found the alternating voices to be rather refreshing. The dual-narrator device can get tricky at times, but in this read, the pacing worked for me. Instead of merely switching between mother and daughter each chapter, we spend an extended amount of time with Violet before launching into a flashback of her mother, Lulu.

Naturally, Tan finds many opportunities to highlight the interconnectedness of her characters. Everyone seems to run in a small social-circle, which inevitably plays into the reccuring theme of identity and Tan’s classic mother-daughter drama.

I appreciate a long read, but in the end, I found this one depressing. Lots of hardship and not much redemption  make for a “particular mood” book that I probably won’t re-read.

Bottom Line: Although I’m not buying this book, I’m still interested in reading Tan’s earlier novels.

In Cold Blood

I Am Become Overwhelmed

 

In Cold Blood

In Cold Blood by Truman Capote

First Line: The village of Holcomb stands on the high wheat plains of western Kansas, a lonesome area that other Kansans call “out there.”

I don’t frequently turn to this genre, which I suppose is why I picked up the title that started it all. I mean, In Cold Blood is the epitome of true crime, right?

Then again, this is more than a true crime read. It’s a psychological study of violence in America, a historical novel, a horror story that gets under your skin in a twisted, emotional way. Our sympathies are naturally inclined toward the Clutter family, then to investigator Alvin Adams Dewey. But as we delve deeper with Capote’s narrative, allegiance becomes blurred. I leave this book with a complicated sense of pity for the murderers. It’s a disgusting tragedy through-and-through, but the writing sure is done well.

I feel compelled to recommend this book because it challenges the reader. Like Lolita, it’s confusing…we try to create answers for why these characters choose this, or do that, but there is no true, concrete explanation.

The ending only emphasizes this sense of loss. The histories of the death row inmates lodging next-door to Dick and Perry are a strong parallels to the boys’ own downward spiral leading to the Clutter family murders. Since mental health is a highlighted theme here, everyone affiliated with these various crimes becomes a victim in some form or other. Quite unsettling.

Bottom Line: Read it because it’s classic and difficult–then follow it with something light.

Three One-Act Plays

All Naughty Ain’t Nice

Three One Act Plays by Woody Allen

Three One-Act Plays by Woody Allen

First Line: Curtain rises on a gray day in New York.

Maybe it’s just me, but I’m a little put out by all the infidelity in literature. So imagine my delight when, after having just purchased this collection, I decide to actually read the book jacket summary. Lo and behold, these one-acts are heralded as “humorous, insightful, and unusually readable plays about infidelity.”

“Oh goodie!” says me. “I bought exactly what I try to avoid!”

This, my friends, is why we must research our reads. I’ve done the work for you on this one…and, I hate to say it, but this collection is underwhelming.

For one thing, the dialogue takes dozens–yes, dozens–of pages to warm up. The openings drag and the conversations seem to go in circles, killing time for much longer than what’s necessary to “build suspense.” The one-liner jokes also struck me as a little forced for believable conversations.

I suppose “Old Saybrook” is the best of the three acts. The introduction of the “author” character Max half-way through the play offers some interesting comments on the writing process, but even this metatheatrical device feels underdeveloped.

Of course, we’re talking about the stage, here. Maybe if I’d seen live performances of these acts, I wouldn’t have been so bored. The situational humor could have come off stronger, and the plot twists might have head more flair when seen in-person.

Overall, though, the plays feel recycled. We’ve read about infidelity before, and these plots don’t add much to the conversation.

Bottom Line: For the better trip down Infidelity Lane, opt instead for the wicked character development and dramatic action of Woody Allen’s film Match Point.

Animal Wise

Monkey See, Monkey Think?

Animal Wise by Virginia Morell

Animal Wise by Virginia Morell

First Line: “Animals have minds.”

What a fun nonfiction read! It was never really a stretch for me to appreciate elephants and dolphins and dogs as being “smart.” But birds and ants? I never thought they had much going on emotionally or intellectually. That is, until I read this book.

When their home is destroyed, ant societies have meticulous house-hunting methods. They include special scouts who find the property and then return home to bring others to the site one-by-one, in a sort of follow-the-leader/teacher-and-student approach. When faced with a set of objects, a parrot can understand the question, “What’s different?” and answer correctly. They not only know how to make judgements—they can articulate their thoughts, too!

The studies with the larger mammals are no less impressive. The two chapters devoted to dolphins left me in awe. Evidently we humans are not the only creatures with the ability to be creative. One pair of dolphins was able to devise a synchronized water trick on their own

The scientists conducting these studies have documented some truly amazing animal behaviors. The question, “Are they thinking?” now shifts to, “What are they thinking?”

Bottom Line: Animal-lover or not, this read forces you to take another long look at the world around us.